Trivia

Hard

Which Game Console’s Cartridges Featured In-cartridge Co-processors?

PlayStation
Atari 6800
SNES
Sega Genesis
An FX GSU-2-SP1 co-processor within an SNES game cartridge.
Lusheeta/Wikimedia

Answer: SNES

Nintendo invested an enormous amount of money in developing and marketing their Super Nintendo Entertainment System and they wanted to maximize the life cycle of the console. Rather than limit games to only accessing the hardware within the SNES console itself, Nintendo built support into the console for in-cartridge processors. When a game came along that needed extra processing power, they could simply add a processor to the board within the cartridge to help out.

The first game to feature such a co-processor was Pilotwings (1991). Pilotwings was followed by dozens of co-processor enhanced titles including: Super Mario Kart, Star Fox, and Mega Man X3. If you’re curious as to whether an old game has an added processor or not, cartridges enhanced with an onboard processor included an additional 16 pins, 8 to each side of the original pins. Simply flip the cartridge upside down and look for the additional pins.

Trivia

Hard

To Aid In Maintenance Urban Planners In Melbourne Australia Assigned Email Addresses To What City Feature?

Trivia

Easy

The Sound Of Your Knuckles Cracking Is Caused By?

Trivia

Easy

A Former Japanese Military Base Is Now Overrun By Tame?

Trivia

Easy

Which Viral Video Was So Popular YouTube Had To Change Their View Count Algorithm To Prevent An Integer Overflow?

Trivia

Hard

In Which Sci-Fi Franchise Did An Actor Marry The Real-Life Daughter Of His On-Screen Predecessor?

Trivia

Hard

Florida Prisons Have Helped Solve Crimes By Distributing What To Inmates?

Trivia

Very Hard

In Computer Chess, The Computer Evaluates The Value Of Moves Using Which Unit Of Measurement?

Trivia

Hard

Baby Incubators, Now A Staple Of Premature Infant Care, Were Pioneered Where?

Trivia

Hard

Which Of These Fruits Was A Symbol Of Hospitality In Colonial America?

Trivia

Hard

Who Was The Only U.S. President To Hold A Patent?