Trivia

Hard

What Is The Longest Stop Motion Movie Ever Created?

The Wind in the Willows
A Town Called Panic
Coraline
Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

Answer: Coraline

Stop motion, an animation technique wherein the animated environment and objects are physically manipulated and incrementally moved for every frame of the film, is an enormously time-consuming endeavour. An large crew can easily spend an entire day working on ten seconds worth of animation. With that in mind, the crew of Coraline–a spooky stop motion adaptation of the Neil Gaiman novel by the same name–should feel extra proud to have participated in creating the longest stop-motion film to date.

Coraline weighs in at one hour and forty minutes. The production of the film involved over 450 people including 35 animators and over 250 designers and technicians. Despite the small scale of the actual sets, the entire production took up 183,000 square feet and included 150 unique sets, a 42-foot long miniature orchard, and not one but three puppet-scale Victorian mansions. Each individual puppet in the film took 10 designers and sculptors 3 months to create. The actual filming took 18 months and was followed by two years of post production editing. Clearly, creating the longest stop motion film of all time is not a job for the weak of heart (or ill funded).

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